“We Make the Road by Walking” Lectionary Readings ~ Sunday, Nov. 30

November 25th, 2014

Daniel 7:9-18; Psalm 46; 1 Timothy 4:7b-10, 14-16; Luke 1:67-79
As Advent begins, a time of waiting in the dark for the Light to come, we hear how important it is for us to prepare ourselves to receive God in Christ, year in and year out. This is a season for expectant, pregnant waiting, where our hope is to be invested not in wishful thinking for things to be different, but in spiritual practices and intentional acts of mercy and generosity. What will you do this Advent to encourage your own and our world’s capacity to receive divine Love? How will you spend these busy weeks leading up to Christmas?

This Week’s Message

November 25th, 2014

As we brought the church year to a close on Sunday with the Feast of Christ the King we looked at how drastically Jesus reinterpreted the ancient image of God as king. Instead of an all-powerful figure on a throne, the kingship revealed in Christ is a servant washing our feet, a man executed on a cross. And most importantly the One so alive that death cannot contain him, the One who forgives us, sets us free, and breathes the Holy Spirit into us. Now that’s one powerful King of Love and Life!

Sermon: The Great Conversation

November 24th, 2014

Dorothy Whiston – The Great Conversation

“We Make the Road by Walking” Lectionary Readings ~ Sunday, Nov. 23

November 19th, 2014

Isaiah 1:4, 11, 16-17, 27, 2:2-4; Psalm 33; Romans 15:2-13; Matthew 9:10-17
People in the Bible often project their own beliefs, actions and desires onto God in order to make themselves look more worthy or to make others look “less than.” How do you discern whether a voice speaking in the Bible, or in your own prayer or life, is God’s voice or just your own or your group’s perspective given divine status? Why does this matter?

This Week’s Message

November 19th, 2014

To be a Christian means, in part, to become a member of the interpretive community Jesus founded, using his own life, death and resurrection as the key to understanding both the scriptures and the world around us. (Which is what got him in so much trouble with the religious authorities.) To participate fully in this Living Word community, we must read the texts with an analytical eye so we can better understand the cultural and historical contexts and original language that gave rise to the words on the page. We must also read with an imaginative eye since sacred texts are filled with poetry and story that help us glimpse deep and timeless truths that can be pointed to only in metaphor. And, of course, we must read with the eye of the heart, humbly opening ourselves to the Spirit’s guidance. Do you emphasize – or neglect – one approach or another when you read the Bible? Why? And what might this cost you in terms of you understanding God’s Word to you?

Sermon: Stories That Shape Us

November 17th, 2014

Dorothy Whiston – Stories That Shape Us

“We Make the Road by Walking” Lectionary Readings ~ Sunday, Nov. 16

November 11th, 2014

2 Kings 2:1-15; Psalm 23; Acts 1:1-11; Luke 24:13-27
What’s really real in the Bible? Is it more about historical facts or the meaning we make from stories rooted in life experience? What does it mean to read the Bible more for ‘formation’ rather than ‘information’?

This Week’s Message

November 11th, 2014

On Sunday we considered how easy it is to think God is on our side in our conflicts, whether personal or social. Like when the Israelites thought God wanted them to utterly destroy the seven tribes living in Canaan when they got to the Promised Land. We also saw Jesus overturn that notion in his feeding of the 4,000 Gentiles — starting with seven loaves and ending with seven baskets left. In God’s world, all are included at no cost to anyone! Jesus also undermined the idea of people’s relative worthiness before God in his banter with the Canaanite (Gentile/outsider/enemy) woman, when he sets himself up to lose the argument about whether he is called to heal her daughter – and look pretty ridiculous in the process. Are we true image bearers of our non-violent, all-embracing God?

Testimony of Carolyn Henderson: Grace and Mercy Unmerited

November 9th, 2014

Carolyn Henderson – Grace and Mercy Unmerited

Sermon: From Ugliness, a Beauty Emerges

November 9th, 2014

Dorothy Whiston – From Ugliness, a Beauty Emerges

 

Home  -  First Baptist Church   -   500 North Clinton St, Iowa City, IA 52240   -   319.338.7995

Facebook

Twitter